April 2015

APR 02, 2015 by Daniel Cruz

Articles In This Issue

UTPA Library Celebrates National Library Week 2015
Info. Commons Gets a Makeover!
International Table Top Day at the UTPA Library
Library Adds Works of Jack Vance
Library Adds New Collection of eBooks
Database Gem: Palgrave E-Book Collection
Copyright – Frequently Asked Questions
Life at the Library Photo Gallery
Credits
Upcoming Library Events

UTPA Library Celebrates National Library Week 2015

by Peter Cortez

The UTPA Library is pleased to celebrate National Library Week with a series of events and promotions occurring throughout the week of April 12th through April 18th.

Food for Fines to Benefit UTPA Food Pantry

The Library will be collecting canned goods and other nonperishable items in exchange for the waiving of library fines. For each food item, the Library will forgive $1 in fines for each nonperishable food item donated. All items collected will be donated to the UTPA Food Pantry which assists students in need at UTPA. No expired, damaged or previously opened items will be accepted. Donated food items will only apply to overdue fines and are not applicable to lost or damaged materials. For more information, please contact the Library’s Circulation Desk at (956) 665-2005.

Library Recognizing Authors and Grant Recipients

Now in its fourth year, the Library is please to recognize UTPA faculty and staff who have published or received grants on behalf of the University. Over 40 authors will be recognized who published a book, or a book chapter during calendar year 2014. Several of these authors are also among the 68 grant awardees at UTPA who were awarded a total of $23.2 million. Several of the published works by UTPA faculty will be on display through April in the Library’s newly renovated main lobby.

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Info. Commons Gets a Makeover!

by Stefanie Lapka


The Information Commons on the 2nd floor of the University Library has gotten a makeover this Spring Break. Crews worked throughout the week-long break to install new carpeting, rearrange the floor plan, and set up new computers. The Information Desk has been moved to the side of the main entrance to create a more open floor plan and provide a larger lounge area for students looking to take a break, wait for friends, or work casually from a comfortable armchair or sofa.

New carpeting now extends from the elevators throughout the entire Information Commons area, creating a cohesive, coordinated space. Along with upgrading the carpeting, an additional 25 new computers have been installed throughout the Commons area. These new machines are large screen, all-in-one computers and will facilitate greater student access capabilities. Also to-be-installed is a large collaborative conference table that will allow groups to connect laptops and tablets to work on projects. This makeover gives the Information Commons a fresher, more contemporary look. For more information, please contact the Library’s Reference Desk at (956) 665-2752.

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International Table Top Day at the UTPA Library

by Carl Nelson

On Saturday, April 11th from 12:00 noon to 6:00pm, the University Library in conjunction with the Office of International Programs will be hosting an event for International Table Top Day. It’ll be held in Room 3.117 on the Library’s 3rd floor.

This is a worldwide event in which organizations will be hosting board, role playing, and card games in order to increase awareness of the importance of games in educational development and reading. Games present an often overlooked but important tool for learning and literacy.

The event will feature traditional as well as non-traditional games. Come and enjoy such games as Ticket to Ride, Monopoly, Settlers of Catan, Infinity, Yu-Gi-Oh!, etc. Participants will be able to have fun and learn at the same time. For more information, contact Carl Nelson at (956) 665-2753 or cnelson@utpa.edu.

 

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Library Adds Works of Jack Vance

by Billy Cryer


Science Fiction and Fantasy aficionados: great news! The Library is thrilled to announce that the complete works of Jack Vance (1916-2013), an American writer most known for his works of high imagination and adventure, have been added to the Library’s permanent collection. All 44 volumes—beautifully bound and illustrated—now reside in the Library for students, staff, and faculty.

Vance is often cited for his imaginative storytelling, his rich, vivid prose, and his sharp, witty dialogue. Although Vance wrote primarily science fiction and fantasy, he also wrote several mystery novels under his real name, John Holbrook Vance. This edition corrects several changes made by publishers to his works over the years. For example, Vance’s first published book appeared in 1950 as The Dying Earth—a collection of short stories chronicling the fascinating adventures of strange and peculiar people on a dying world. Vance’s original title was Mazirian the Magician, which has been restored in the new edition.

Vance’s many accolades include the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and the World Fantasy Award, among others. Numerous contemporary authors have credited Vance as a major influence in their own writing, including George R. R. Martin, Neil Gaiman, and Michael Moorcock.

The Jack Vance collection was provided by a generous donation of the Paul Allen Foundation. Paul Allen is most known as the co-founder of Microsoft, and is also an avid Jack Vance fan. You can find the complete Vance collection in the stacks on the fourth floor of the Library. For more information about the Jack Vance collection, contact Billy Cryer at bjcryer@utpa.edu or (956) 665-2799.

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Library Adds New Collection of eBooks

by Peter Cortez


The Library is pleased to announce the purchase of two new eBook collections. The Past Masters series, available through the InteLex Corporation, includes the works of William James, Jane Addams, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Josiah Royce and Charles Pierce. According to their web site, the series “…encompasses the largest collection of primary source full-text electronic editions in philosophy in the world. It includes significant collections in the history of political thought and theory, religious studies, education, German studies, sociology, the history and philosophy of science, economics, and classics.” For more information, please contact the Reference Desk at (956) 665-2752.

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Database Gem: Palgrave E-Book Collection

by Carl Nelson


The UTPA Library Palgrave E-Book Collections are a set of resources dealing with topics in Political Science, History, Sociology, and Literature. Materials include not only single titles but also monographic series such as International Political Economy and Studies of the Americas. They are extremely useful for students and faculty, especially for those in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Giving researchers access to a group of books covering a specific discipline in an easy to access format. The electronic collection can also help students and faculty looking for materials in history and literature as well. Palgrave has a number of titles dealing with Transnational and other sub-topics of these two important humanities subjects. This set of E-Books is also a great resource for individuals researching gender and equality issues. The Palgrave E-Book Collection is a very useful tool for individuals studying the Humanities or Social Behavioral Sciences.

Accessing the Palgrave E-Book Collection is simple. Go to the E-Books link under Find on the main UTPA Library webpage. Select it and that will take you to a list of all of our Electronic Book providers. From there scroll down until you find Palgrave Connect. Click on that link and it will take you into the Palgrave E-Book Collection. Once in the electronic resource users have a number of options to access the collection. They can browse the materials right from Palgrave’s main webpage. Students and faculty can also use the search box in the upper right hand corner of the site and below that is an Advanced Search link that will allow users to do title or author queries. The advanced search has other options as well. Besides browsing and searching users can also use the tool bar on the left of Palgrave’s website to look at books by major subject, book series, year, or book collection. Palgrave E-Book Collection is a great resource and tool that allows users to access materials remotely.

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Copyright – Frequently Asked Questions

by Kelly Leu


Copyright logo

“How can I ‘copyright’ my thesis?”  I run across this question quite frequently, and it is often accompanied with a certain amount of anxiety. Copyright is exceptionally easy to obtain in the United States because it is granted automatically. It’s not necessary for the author to DO anything special to gain copyright protection. Developing a better understanding about just what copyright protects and what rights are granted to an author may help to alleviate concerns related to managing one’s own copyright.

What’s in it for me?

Copyright is intended as an economic incentive for authors and creators, so the rights you obtain are associated with activities that are likely to generate an income. They include the right to create and distribute copies of a work, the right to publicly display or perform a work, and the right to create derivatives based on the original.  These rights are exclusive, so if anyone else wants to make copies of your thesis, sell copies of it, or post it online, they would need your permission to do so. These rights also come with limitations. For example, copyright expires after a set number of years. Copyright in a thesis will last for 70 years after the author dies. There are also exceptions in the copyright law, like fair use, that allow permission-free use and copying by others.

In scholarly righting, attribution and credit are often of greater concern than financial compensation but this is not really addressed by copyright law. Copyright does not guarantee a right to be given credit for your discoveries, data, and ideas discussed in your work. While a very important ethical standard in academia, attribution is not included as part of an owner’s exclusive rights.

**More information about the exclusive rights, copyright duration, and exceptions can be found here: Title 17, 106, Title 17, 302(a),  Title 17, 107.

Copyright covers a lot

Copyright protection can extend to a wide variety of creative expression such as: books, articles, artwork, music, audio recordings, images, film, and even architecture. As a literary work, a thesis would qualify for protection as long as it satisfies the minimal requirements for copyright protection. For example, a work must be something original that you have authored, it must also have some minimal spark of creativity, and it must be written or recorded so that others are able to read, watch, or hear it. That’s it!  So rest assured, from the moment you put pen to paper (or hit “save” in Word) and started writing your thesis, it was protected by copyright. You are not even required to add a copyright mark (©) to the work.

… but not everything is included.

It is important to keep in mind that not everything can be protected by copyright. Protection does not extend to short words, ideas, data, discoveries, or facts. Copyright simply protects the manner in which various facts and ideas are discussed in a work. For example, if you coin a term for a concept that you come up with in your research, that term is not protected by copyright. In fact, someone else may discuss ideas and data presented in your work, and even use your new term. As long as they avoid imitating how you have approached writing about the topic, they will not be infringing on your copyright. Discussing the ideas of others for critical purposes or to support one’s own arguments is a normal part of scholarly discourse and, of course, if someone were to discuss some of your data, ideas, or use your new term, they are ethically obligated to give you credit when they do so.

**More information about what is and is not covered by copyright can be found here: Title 17, 102, Title 37, 202.1.

Establishing your copyright claim

While registration and copyright notices are not required in order to obtain copyright protection, use of one or both is a good idea. It is possible that an act of plagiarism can sometimes also be copyright infringement, such as when a significant portion of the text is copied or paraphrased in a way that closely imitates the original. In such cases, public disclosures of your copyright claim in your work, such as a copyright notice and official registration, can help enforce your copyright.

Copyright notices are easy to include and are an effective means for identifying copyright owners. Knowing this is an important first step for obtaining permission to reuse a work, when needed. Registering your work with the US Copyright Office creates a public record of your claim in a work. The process of registration is a relatively easy and inexpensive. Not only is it necessary for filing an infringement lawsuit, registration also allows the possibility for being awarded statutory damages and attorney’s fees.  While it is fairly easy to do this on your own, if you are publishing your thesis with ProQuest, filing for registration is a part of the service that they provide.

**More information about copyright notices and filing registration information can be found here: Circular 1, p7, Title 17, 401-407, Title 17, 408-412.

To learn more about copyright, ownership, and copyright exemptions, visit the library’s Copyright Guide. You are also welcome to stop by the Copyright Advisory Center or contact Kelly Leu, the Copyright Librarian, at (956) 665-2623 or via email at leukk@utpa.edu.

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Life at the Library Photo Gallery

Click on first photo to enlarge and start the slideshow and press Esc to exit.

     Journey Stories - Exhibit Entrance (photo by Virginia Haynie Gause)     Journey Stories Exhibit (photo by Virginia Haynie Gause)     Journey Stories - visiting class (photo by Virginia Haynie Gause)Journey Stories - first visitors, February 17, 2015 (photo by Virginia Haynie Gause)     Journey Stories 5 - visitors looking at the kiosk display (photo by Virginia Haynie Gause)     2nd Floor after renovations (photo by David Luna)

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Credits

Editor: Peter Cortez

Writers: Peter Cortez, Stefanie Lapka, Carl Nelson, Billy Cryer, Kelly Leu

Photographs: Virginia Haynie Gause and David Luna

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Upcoming Library Events

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