November 2014

NOV 17, 2014 by Daniel Cruz

Articles In This Issue

“So, How Many Print Credits Do I Have at UTPA?”
Library Hours for Thanksgiving and Final Exams
Lunchtime Learning at Your Library
The LIBER Book Fair in Barcelona
Library Lobby Undergoes Complete Renovation
Traveling Smithsonian Exhibition Coming to the UTPA
Using the Internet Wisely and How Creative Commons Helps
Database Gem – Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA)
Disability Services at the Library
New E-Resources Available @ the Library
Dia de los Muertos / Day of the Dead Event in Special Collections
New Furniture Adding to Finishing Touches for Library Lobby
Renovations to Shary Room and Archives Complete
Credits
Upcoming Library Events

“So, How Many Print Credits Do I Have at UTPA?”

by Rick Peralez

The University Library wants to remind all students that they have separate print credit allowances for the Library and for the rest of computer labs on campus. Students have a total print credit allowance of 300 per semester in the Library. For all computer labs at UTPA that are not located in the Library, 250 print credits are allocated per student per semester. This brings the total print credits to 550. New printing allowances will be allocated to each student at the beginning of every semester. There is also a printer available for those printing from their personal devices located on the 3rd floor for which students can use their computer lab print credits. For more information about print credits in the Library, please contact the Reference Desk at (956) 665-2752. For more information about printing credits in Academic Computer Labs at UTPA, please visit their web site at www.utpa.edu/dit/ or call (956) 665-2020.

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Library Hours for Thanksgiving and Final Exams

by Peter Cortez

Below are the changes to the Library hours of operation for the Thanksgiving holiday and the fall semester final exams:

Thanksgiving Holiday

Wednesday, November 26, 2014 – 7:30 am – 6:00 pm

Thursday, November 27th & Friday, November 28th – CLOSED

Final Exams

The Library will be open until 2:00am, Sundays through Thursdays
Beginning Sunday, November 30th

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Lunchtime Learning at Your Library

by Karen Holt

This semester the Library started a Lunchtime Learning Series. Targeted to the research needs of undergraduate and graduate students, the series has included well-attended sessions on mindmapping, copyright, Twitter in academic research, creating citations, and effective research strategies, among others. All sessions took place in Library Classroom 1 and attendees were encouraged to bring their lunch. The series was an overall success with dozens of students, faculty, and staff attending over the course of the semester.

We will also be offering a similar series in the spring. Just check out the UTPA Library’s homepage for all our Lunchtime Learning offerings.

If there is a particular topic that you would like us to cover, just let us know! You can email your suggestions to Stefanie Lapka at lapkasa@utpa.edu or contact her at (956) 665-2752.

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The LIBER Book Fair in Barcelona

by Karen Holt

This year Dr. Farzaneh Razzaghi, Dean of the UTPA Library, and Karen Holt, Head of Reference & Instructional Services, were honored with invitations from the Spanish government to attend the LIBER Book Fair in Barcelona, the premier Spanish language book fair in Europe. LIBER took place between Oct. 1st and 3rd and featured all of Spain’s major publishers.

Dr. Razzaghi and Ms. Holt met with a variety of publishers and selected over 200 new Spanish language titles in a variety of subject areas for the collection. As the Library builds its Spanish language collections to meet the needs of our new bilingual, bicultural university, we are proud to offer students, faculty, and staff the latest publications from Spain.

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Library Lobby Undergoes Complete Renovation

by Peter Cortez

The main lobby for the University Library has undergone a complete transformation following over three months of construction and renovations that encompassed the entire summer. Immediately following the end of the spring semester, crews cordoned off the center area of the lobby in order to remove the floor tiles and gut the entire ceiling. Along with upgrading the area, plans were to complement the recently added University Bookstore and Jazzman’s Café, located across from each other just off the main lobby. The ceiling was slightly lowered and now has a three dimensional look. The eye is drawn to wave-like patterns in the ceiling that flow from north to south leading one to either entry way of the lobby. The completed look is brighter, fresher, and more contemporary. Soon-to-be completed are the display cases built into support columns and adjacent Archive renovations in the area that once housed the Shary Room and lobby.

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Traveling Smithsonian Exhibition Coming to the UTPA Library

by Virginia Haynie Gause

Journey Stories, a traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution is scheduled to open February 16, 2015 at UTPA Library. It will be on display in Room 3.117 through March 29th. UTPA is one of only six places in Texas that the exhibit will travel to this year and UTPA was able to schedule it to coincide with FESTIBA 2015.

The theme of the exhibit is immigration, migration, and transportation. For a quick glance at what the exhibit is about take a look at this short video:

The Library hopes the exhibit inspires viewers to think about how they and their ancestors first came to South Texas. Recent immigrants may have come by automobile, bus, or plane. However, in the past, they may have arrived by railroad, wagon train, or boat. When thinking about these journeys, some may wonder:  What essentials did the traveler pack for the journey? Did they travel from another country? What obstacles did they encounter along the way?

The Library hopes the exhibit will inspire students to incorporate projects connected to journey topics, whether the students are in history, art, literature, creative writing, music, or other coursework.

Journey Stories has been made possible at UTPA by the Texas State Historical Association. The exhibit is part of Museum on Main Street, a collaboration between the Smithsonian Institution and State Humanities Councils nationwide. Support for Museum on Main Street has been provided by the United States Congress.

For more details, contact Virginia Haynie Gause at (956) 665-2303 (vgause@utpa.edu).

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Using the Internet Wisely and How Creative Commons Helps

by Kelly Leu

Copyright LogoThe Internet allows us to access a variety of material for free online. Technology has made it easy to copy and share files with a simple click of a button. Many folks assume that if they are able to access something online, then it is free to use in any way that they like. It’s so easy to do, that it is hard to fathom that copying an image you found in Google and uploading it on your own website could be wrong. Can’t they employ some technology that would stop you are at least warn you? Unfortunately this is not the case, and acting on this assumption can land you in hot water! One blogger’s sad story.

What’s up with that?

It is highly likely that most content that you find on the Internet is protected by copyright, whether it is an image without a copyright notice, or it’s a full length feature film. If you make a copy of an image you found online or download an episode of “Game of Thrones” you found on YouTube, without proper authorization, you could be engaging in copyright infringement. Copyright protection is pretty easy to get. No official notice or registration is required to obtain protection, so even if you don’t see a symbol, ©, or someone’s name on something, that material could still be protected by copyright. Copyright also lasts for a very long time, so even really “old” material, like a film from the 1950s can still have protection. In fact, the current term length for copyright is for the life of the author, plus an additional 70 years.

Creative Commons Licenses – A Safer Option

Not all content found online is automatically off limits for reuse, but it is recommended that you be selective about what you use and where you go to find it. Searching out Creative Commons (CC) licensed content is one great way to find content that is already licensed for reuse.

CC licenses are a special licenses that creators can attach to content that they have personally authored. These licenses provide others with permission to reuse content. Conditions and permission are identified with icons, abbreviations, and a link to a copy of the license that provides a detailed explanation about the license. All licenses will allow you to make copies and distribute copies of a work as long as you attribute the original source. Some licenses will also allow you to create remixes or adapt the original. In addition to the attribution requirement, other conditions you might find with a CC license may include requiring that you release your new creation under the same license as the item you are reusing, or that you only reuse the material for non-commercial purposes. Some licenses may also prohibit modifying the original item.

CC-BY-SA 3.0 Logo

Example of a Creative Commons license statement. This license allows copying, remixing, and distribution as long as you attribute the original and the new work uses the same license as the original.

Since these licenses come in a number of different varieties, when you do find a CC licensed item, it is a good idea to check the license to see whether it matches your purpose. For example, if you would like to use an image on a tee-shirt that you plan to sell as a fund raiser, you will want to avoid using images that are marked with a non-commercial reuse license. Finding CC licensed material is relatively easy due to special coding that is added to content that allows it to be located via commons search engines, like Google or Bing. The Creative Commons Search page is a great place to start, if you would like to explore CC licensed content in greater detail.

To learn more about the copyright or Creative Commons licensing, visit the Library’s Copyright Guide. You are also welcome to stop by the Copyright Advisory Center or contact Kelly Leu, the Copyright Librarian, at (956) 665-2623 or via email at leukk@utpa.edu.

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Database Gem – Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA)

by Carl Nelson

Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA) is a database dedicated to the exploration of communication in all of its forms. It looks at numerous aspects of language including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. For the field of linguistics, it has extensive information on descriptive, historical, comparative, theoretical, and geographical linguistics. This database covers major areas including hearing and speech physiology, hearing (pathological and normal), and learning disabilities as well as nonverbal communication which will be invaluable to individuals studying the field of Communication Sciences and Disorders. Besides the clinic materials, individuals involved in the study of communication will find it useful for locating information on broadcast and other media. The database contains not only scholarly articles but books, abstracts of theses/dissertations, and Conference Papers & Proceedings. Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA) is updated monthly and over the course of a year has 14,000 new records added.

The interface for Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA) is easy to use. A quick or basic search is presented when you first enter the database. In order to get started, all you have to do is enter your search terms and select the search button. An advanced search is also offered which allows users to enter multiple subjects as well as use a number of different modifiers to limit or expand queries. Individuals using the resource can modify searches by date, language, age, and a number of other different qualifiers. The Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts (LLBA) interface also allows users to browse complete journals within the database. Once an article is located, accessing it is a simple process of selecting the full text link at the bottom of the source’s bibliographic information. Another cool feature accessible through the results page is the “Cited By” link, a handy little feature allowing users to see other materials which have cited the search result. This user friendly database offers unprecedented access to linguistic and language materials, one that students and faculty will find indispensable in their research. For more information, please contact the Reference Desk at (956) 665-2752.

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Disability Services at the Library

by Daniel Cruz

Your UTPA Library wants to remind you that our services and resources are fully accessible to those with disabilities. From access ramps leading to its doors, to designated restrooms to accommodate wheelchairs, to special machines to facilitate learning and research, the Library makes itself available to all users.

With the help of the JAWS screen reading software, located on the west side of the 2nd floor, visually impaired patrons can use our computers with greater ease. They can take advantage of this software by using its text-to-speech option or by using a Refreshable Braille Display (not provided by the Library). JAWS software is also capable of taking input from a Braille keyboard, should the patron have one of their own.

Sorenson VRS, also located on the west side of the 2nd floor, is a Video Relay Service in which hearing impaired patrons can use ASL to make local calls free of charge. The machine allows the user to call an interpreter through a video phone. The interpreter then calls the intended person and interprets the sign language both to and from the user.

A TDD system, located on the west side of the 3rd floor, provides an alternate way for the hearing impaired to call people on the telephone. The Library provides a traditional corded phone that hooks up into the system which then translates speech to text. A keyboard on the system allows for conversation between the two parties.

Two Kurzweil machines, located on the east side of the 3rd floor, are designed to scan text from a book and provide output via speakers. The Library also provides audio cassette recording devices connected to these machines so that one can record the text that is being read. Next to these machines are two desktop video magnifying machines designed to magnify anything placed underneath them. Both sets of machines are designed to aid those with visual impairments.

Library staff are ready and willing to help anyone with disabilities access Library resources and want patrons of all types to feel welcome and comfortable. For more information, please contact the Reference Desk at (956) 665-2752. We look forward to having you visit us!

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New E-Resources Available @ the Library

by John Asbell

The UTPA Library has added three exciting new E-Resources in the past several months:

The Works of William James, edited by Frederick H. Burkhardt, Fredson Bowers, and Ignas K. Skrupskelis, and published by Harvard University Press is a 19 volume e-book available on the Past Masters platform (along with many other philosophy e-books). This fully searchable resource contains James’ major works, along with essays and manuscripts.

Additionally, the Library recently acquired access to approximately 504 e-books from Project Muse. These e-books are published by major university presses along with scholarly publishers. The titles included in this collection are fully searchable and allow for printing and download at the chapter level.

Also, the Library now has access to a collection of medical e-books from Taylor and Francis. Called MEDICINEnetBASE, this collection contains 440 medical titles in such sub-fields as biomedical science, nutrition, nanoscience, and technology, among others. These e-books are fully searchable and downloadable or printable on the chapter level as a PDF file.

For assistance with using these new resources, please visit the Reference Desk on the 2nd floor of the Library, or call (956) 665-2752.

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Dia de los Muertos / Day of the Dead Event in Special Collections

by Janette Garcia

Cultures around the world celebrate a day of spirits when the living remember and honor the dead. In Mexico, it is called Dia de los Muertos. On Thursday, October 30, 2014 Special Collections welcomed newcomers and aficionados of this traditional celebration.

Dia de los Muertos is a blending of Native Indian and Spanish Catholic beliefs, and is related to the American Halloween (All Hallows Eve). As the earth moves from summer’s growth to winter’s rest, it is believed that those who have passed are close to the living. It is a time to celebrate family and ancestors. Altars, such as the one on display in Special Collections, are set up to serve as a focal point to honor and remember either specific dead, be they a relative or a public figure, or as a general observance for all. The ofrendas (offerings) often include favorite foods and beverages as well as pictures of the deceased, candles, sugar skulls, and paper decorations. Hot chocolate and pan de muerto, a special bread, is served to the living to enjoy as they reflect on the past year and family. Many families visit cemeteries together in order to remember and honor their deceased family members.

Visitors to Special Collections were able to enjoy pan de muerto and hot chocolate as they learned more about the celebration and traditions and more about what Special Collections has to offer. It was an excellent opportunity for many students who had not yet visited Special Collections to learn about our regional resources on southern Texas and northeastern Mexico including folklore and border traditions.

Day of the Dead Photo 1
Day of the Dead Photo 2

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New Furniture Adding to Finishing Touches for Library Lobby

by Peter Cortez

Renovations to the Library’s main lobby are nearly complete with the addition of new furniture throughout the area. New chairs, ottomans, and sofas were added to provide much needed seating to students and visitors. The contemporary colors and design of the pieces complement the look of the new flooring and ceiling. The display cases built into the support columns are also nearing completion with the installation of lighting, shelving, and glass panels. All work is expected to be complete by the spring semester.

 

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Renovations to Shary Room and Archives Complete

by Peter Cortez


Along with renovations to the Library’s main lobby, the Library’s Shary Room has also undergone a major transformation. Beginning just after the spring semester, all collections and materials were cleared from the room as it was gutted and renovated so as to make better use of the space and also facilitate research for those using either the John Shary Collection, the Kika de la Garza Congressional Papers, or the University Archives. Along with additional seating, space-saving compact shelving units were installed to accommodate the growing number of archival containers. New office spaces and work areas for Archives staff that allow for greater interactions with researchers and visitors to the area were also added. For more information, please contact the Library’s Special Collections Department at (956) 665-2726.

 

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Credits

Editor:  Peter Cortez

Writers:  Rick Peralez, Peter Cortez, Karen Holt, Virginia Haynie Gause, Kelly Leu, Carl Nelson, Daniel Cruz, John Asbell, Janette Garcia

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Upcoming Library Events

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