June 2014

JUN 02, 2014 by Diane Tyink

Articles In This Issue

Global Lens Films for June and July
Soon to Come: The Library Learning Commons
New Video Tutorials
24/7 Library Chat Available
UTPA Library Celebrates National Library Week
New E-Resources at the Library
The Ownership Puzzle-Copyright and Multiple Authors
GIS/Media Lab: Editing with Photoshop
Graphic Design Class Helps Promote Library Services
Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Leticia De Leon
Library Hours
Life at the Library Photo Gallery
Library on Social Media Networks
Credits
Upcoming Library Events

Global Lens Films for June and July

by Virginia Haynie Gause

The June and July Global Lens Films will be screened in the UTPA Library Auditorium. The screenings are free and open to the public. They begin at 7:00 p.m. and end by 9:00 p.m.

Thursday, June 5th, the film “The Parade,” a 115 minute film from Serbia will be screened in the Library Auditorium. A group of gay activists in Belgrade strikes a tense alliance with Limun, a Serbian crime boss, whose fiancée demands an extravagant wedding that only struggling gay theater director Mirko and his friends can provide. In exchange, macho Limun reluctantly agrees to provide security for the group’s Pride parade. Previous attempts to march were met with mass violence from rightwing skinheads. When Limun’s gang balks at the assignment, he recruits a band of former Balkan War combatants, now dear friends, who will stand up to the racists Seven Samurai–style, in this rollickingly shrewd and humane comedic take on a vital human rights issue. The trailer for “The Parade” can be viewed here.

Thursday, July 10th, the film “Student,” a 90 minute film from Kazakhstan will be screened in the Library Auditorium. A solitary philosophy student steers his directionless life toward the commission of a violent crime, spurred on by postmodern musings and a post-Soviet order characterized by growing inequality, institutional corruption and a ruthless ethic of eat-or-be-eaten. Inspired by Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, director Darezhan Omirbayev roots his nameless student in the losing segment of Kazakhstan’s new capitalist era, whose population watches the rich rise above common legal proscriptions and old-fashioned communal values. Omirbayev’s brooding protagonist may prove the willing student of the age, but he alone reckons with the consequences of his actions—a gesture strikingly at odds with a world losing a consistent concept of justice. The trailer for “Student” can be viewed here.

The films in the series are selected by The Global Film Initiative and feature narrative films from Africa, Asia, Central and Eastern Europe, Latin America and the Middle East. All the films have English subtitles. View the complete screening schedule. After the screenings, the UTPA Library adds these films to the Library collection and they are available for check out. Click here for a list of Global Lens films available for check out from the UTPA Library.

For more information or special accommodations, contact Virginia Haynie Gause at 956-665-2303 (vgause@utpa.edu) or Nadia Gallegos at 956-665-2282 (ngallegos@utpa.edu).

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Soon to Come: The Library Learning Commons

by Peter Cortez

The Library’s 2nd Floor Reference and Instructional Services Department has been undergoing a transformation of sorts over the last several months. It’s gone from a space whose perimeter was lined with towering shelves of reference books to a largely empty, almost cavernous, space with little obstructing one’s line of sight. The same chairs, tables and study areas remain. But why are so many shelves being removed and what’s happening to all the books? Most importantly, what’s going to be done with all this newly freed up space? For the most complete answers, several questions were posed to Karen Holt, Head Reference and Instructional Services Librarian:

Q: What exactly is happening in the Reference Department with regard to its space?

Karen: The library has integrated our reference collection into our circulating collection, and we have moved over 20,000 books during the last year to create the space to build a Library Learning Commons. That’s why you see so many empty shelves on the 2nd floor. This summer we’ll be moving the remaining empty shelving units into our Archives area. By the fall semester our former reference area will be completely transformed into a state-of-the-art Learning Commons.

Q: Why is this being done?

Karen: We decided to undertake this transformation because we noticed that our print reference collection was being used less and less. We wanted to utilize our space in a way that would offer the maximum benefit to our students. So, we decided to integrate our reference collection with our circulating collection and create a Learning Commons on our second floor. The Learning Commons will offer innovative technology for students, more seating space, and collaborative work areas.

Q: What are the plans for the summer and what can students expect for the fall semester?

Karen: You can expect an extreme makeover of the 2nd floor over the summer. We’ll be moving out all the empty shelving units and in the beginning of the summer we will feature a variety of potential furniture options for the Learning Commons. Students will be able to test out all the designs and vote for their favorites. The Library hopes the furniture students like best will be what is chosen to be included in the new Learning Commons.

Q: Once completed, what kind of impact do you expect or hope these changes will have on reference services?

Karen: I think that the Learning Commons will have a tremendous impact on reference services and student learning. We hope that the new space will foster an even more collaborative work environment between students and librarians. We also anticipate that librarians will be more involved with assisting students with navigating both library resources and the new technologies that will be incorporated in the Learning Commons. For more information, please contact the Reference Desk at 956-665-2752.

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New Video Tutorials

by Carl Nelson

Database video tutorials are now available on the UTPA Library’s Facebook Page and will be available soon on the Library’s YouTube Channel. Created by the Reference and Instructional Services Department, the tutorials provide a detailed how-to for searching the UTPA Library Online Catalog as well how to use the Emerald, Business Full Text, Legal Collection, and Business Source Complete databases. These tutorials can be of immense help to those just beginning their research. Also the database videos are geared towards the MBA and PASS distance learners, giving them an introduction to electronic resources that are vital tools for finding information in their disciplines. They are also great resources to patrons who need a quick lesson on how to access and search the Library’s information tools. If you have any questions about these video tutorials, please call the Reference Desk at 956-665-2752.

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24/7 Library Chat Available

by Rick Peralez

In an effort to continue to help students even after the Library is closed, the Library has made arrangements to have a librarian available for online chat help 24/7. If you need help late at night after the Library has closed or on the weekend before the Library opens, you can still have access to a trained librarian online to help with any questions you may have. Technical or access issues will normally be addressed the following business day. For additional information or questions please contact the Library Reference Desk at 956-665-2752.

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UTPA Library Celebrates National Library Week

by Peter Cortez and Carl Nelson

The UTPA Library held several events to celebrate and promote National Library Week throughout the week of April 14th through April 18th.

Library Screens Film: “Following the Ninth”

The Library kicked off National Library Week with a screening of the new film, “Following the Ninth: In the Footsteps of Beethoven’s Final Symphony.” The film tells the story Beethoven’s famous Ninth Symphony, specifically focusing on the impact the piece has had on people around the world for over 200 years in times of crisis in their countries. It discusses the impact that music has had on people in China, Chile, Germany, Japan and other parts of the world. The web site for the film extols how Beethoven’s Ninth, “…resonates still as the international anthem of hope.”

Dr. Andrés Amado, UTPA ethnomusicologist, introduced the film and led the audience in a discussion following the showing of the film. UTPA cello and double bass students, along with their professors Dr. Tido Janssen and Dr. George Amorim, performed excerpts from the 4th movement of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony: the recitative and theme. These extracts are considered iconic representations of Beethoven’s genius as it was he who inaugurated a new era in symphonic writing.

The screening was free and open to all students, faculty, staff and the general public. Several copies of the book Kerry Candaele and Greg Mitchell’s book “Journeys with Beethoven” were given as door prizes. Candaele is the producer and director of “Following the Ninth”.

Finding the Source: A Discussion of Idea Generation for Writing!

The Library’s Reference and Instructional Services Department in conjunction with UTPA’s Page One Common Reader Program sponsored, “Finding the Source: A Discussion of Idea Generation for Writing!”, an event that was part of National Library Week. Held on April 15th at noon in one of the Library’s classrooms, the event brought together faculty members Maria Herrera (English), Katherine Hoerth (English), Dr. Jessica Lavariega-Monforti (Political Science), Dr. Marci McMahon (English), Dr. Javier Kypuros (Engineering), and Dr. Leticia Deleon (Curriculum & Instruction).  Led by Reference and Instructional Services Librarian Carl Nelson, the program and related discussion focused on writing and generating ideas for the creation of a number of different types of literature.  Speakers related their experiences as authors and their various inspirations.

Library Waives Fines for Children’s Books Donations

The Library coordinated the donation of dozens of books to the UTPA Child Development Center and Edinburg Children’s Hospital as part of National Library Week festivities.  In order to encourage users to return overdue books and clear any related fines, the Library agreed to waive $10.00 in fines for every children’s book that was donated.  A total of 40 books were donated in exchange for the waiver and an additional 16 were independently donated.  Overall, the Library forgave over four hundred dollars in fines and was able to recover over two dozen overdue books.  A book that was due in January 2013 was returned making it the most overdue item turned in during National Library Week.

Library Holds 3rd Annual Author Recognition

The Library was proud to hold its 3rd Annual Authors Recognition on Tuesday, April 15th. This year’s event was held in the University Ballroom and was attended by over 100 people including UTPA President Dr. Robert Nelsen and Provost Dr. Havidan Rodriguez.

Now in its third year, the Library arranged the celebration for the approximately 44 faculty and staff members at UTPA who published a book or book chapter during the 2013-14 academic year. The event also celebrated 71 grant awardees at UTPA who received grants totaling more than $29 million.

Library Dean Dr. Farzaneh Razzaghi was overjoyed with the turnout and overall success of the event. “We had 34 authors recognized last year. So we have had a 29 percent increase since then. This is a celebration of your accomplishments”, said Razzaghi as she spoke before those attending.

UTPA President Dr. Robert Nelsen spoke at the event, expressing his gratitude for those present who, through their publications and grant funded research, extend and promote the reputation of the University throughout the nation and across the globe.

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New E-Resources at the Library

by John Asbell

The UTPA Library has recently purchased two sets of e-books to add to our growing e-book collection. One of these acquisitions is from the publisher Palgrave, and includes 5 collections from the 2014 front list which, when complete, will total approximately 577 titles. The collections in this purchase include History, Language & Linguistics, Social Sciences, Education, and Theatre and Performance.

The second major e-book acquisition is from the publisher Springer which includes 13 collections from the 2014 catalog. These collections include Behavioral Science, Biomedical & Life Science, Business & Economics, Chemistry & Materials Science, Computer Science, Earth & Environmental Science, Energy, Engineering, Humanities, Social Science & Law, Mathematics & Statistics, Medicine, Physics & Astronomy, and Professional & Applied Computing. By the end of the publishing year, this collection will yield approximately 6,431 titles.

Records are added for these titles as the books become available throughout the publishing year, and they are available in the Library catalog alongside the records for all library materials. If you have questions about these materials or any other library materials, please contact the Information Desk at 956-665-5282.

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The Ownership Puzzle: Copyright and Multiple Authors

by Kelly Leu

~~Copyright is granted to the creator or author of a work.~~

This statement appears to be very simple and straightforward, but in reality, copyright ownership can be a very complex issue. One recent lawsuit, Garcia v. Google, Inc., is a very good illustration of how complex ownership can be. Ms. Garcia, an actress, objects to the use of her performance, which was intended for the film “Desert Warrior,” but was instead used in entirely different film, “Innocence of Muslims.” This film is highly controversial and she wishes to prevent her performance from being shown in a trailer that was posted on YouTube. As a strategy, she is claiming copyright ownership in her performance. If she really is the copyright owner of this performance, permission would be required to display it on YouTube and it would have to be removed if she denied this permission. The parties in this case are arguing over a number of complex issues, including the question over whether Ms. Garcia could be considered a copyright owner in her performance.

Paths to Ownership
There are multiple ways that one can become a copyright owner. Normally, the person who creates a work, the author, artist, or composer, is also the copyright owner. It is also possible for an employer or another entity to be the owner. This might occur through an arrangement known as a “work made for hire,” or via a transfer of ownership, achieved through a written contract. In the work for hire context, an author may be an employee, working in a traditional employer/employee relationship where the employer assigns work hours, a workspace and equipment, and provides a regular wage or salary, etc. Alternatively, someone can be hired as an independent contractor for the purposes of contributing to a specific work. In this case, contractors and employers must sign a written agreement transferring copyright ownership to the entity commissioning the work. (U.S. Copyright Office, 2011, Chapter 2, p. 126).

It Takes a Village
It is also possible for more than one person to claim ownership in a work and the law distinguishes between types of multi-authored works. Depending on the context, a contributor may enjoy ownership in the entire work, or just a portion of the work. With “joint works,” the contributing parties have equal rights in the entire work. This assumes that the contributions were created specifically for the work and are “inseparable” and intended to be combined together as a “unitary whole.” In other words, the contributions made must be integral to the work as a whole. A good example of a joint work is an illustrated children’s book where an illustrator has created artwork to accompany the text of the story. If the illustrator only provided the artwork for the book cover, he could not be a joint owner in the entire work. He would only be the copyright owner of the art on the cover, since this contribution is not likely to be considered inseparable to the work as a whole.

“Collective works” are comprised of multiple contributions which are independent works that have been “assembled into a collective whole.” Contributors in collective works do not own copyright in the entire collective work, but only in the portion that they contribute. An anthology of short stories by multiple authors is a good example of a collective work. (U.S. Copyright Office, 2011, Chapter 1, p. 2, 3, and Chapter 2, p. 126). In collective or joint works, written agreements can be used, not only for transfer of copyright ownership, but also for clarifying the roles and expectations of all the parties contributing to a work. For example, an author may retain his copyright in his short story that he was commissioned to write for an anthology, but provide a license to the books’ publisher that allows the work to be reproduced and distributed in the anthology.

Muddy Waters
Motion pictures, which involve numerous contributors, are generally considered a joint work as well as a “work made for hire.” Contributors, like actors, crew members, or screenwriters, do not usually hold copyright ownership in the film because they are either employed by the production company or are hired as independent contractors who have signed work for hire agreements (KB-Law). In the Garcia case, the court does not believe that work for hire is applicable to Garcia, since she was not a traditional employee and a written contract was not used. While the opinion indicates that Garcia is not a joint owner in the entire film, and Garcia does not make this claim, she is claiming an independent copyright interest in her specific performance as a “separable” part, like the book cover analogy discussed above. The court also stated that she has a convincing copyright claim and that she simply granted the filmmaker an implied license to use her performance in the film (Garcia v. Google, Inc, p. 6, 10-13).

Not everyone agrees that Garcia is able to make this claim over her performance in the film. A recent brief issued by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (Amicus Brief, 2014, p.6), calls this claim “novel ” and even the US Copyright rejected her application, pointing out that the law does not allow copyright claims by individual actors in their film performances (Supp. Brief, 2014, p. 11). While the Garcia case examines the question of copyright ownership, this is not the only issue addressed in the case. Also at dispute is Garcia’s implied license, complaints about personal safety, and questions about free speech and the public interest. The question of copyright ownership and many of these issues are still open to debate as Google and supporters continue to file briefs arguing against the latest decision.

To learn more about copyright, ownership, and copyright exemptions, visit the library’s Copyright Guide. You are also welcome to stop by the Copyright Advisory Center or contact Kelly Leu, the Copyright Librarian, at 956-665-2623 or via email at leukk@utpa.edu.

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GIS/Media Lab: Editing with Photoshop

by Roel Resendez

Students interested in editing photographs or designing digital artwork are welcome to use the GIS/Media Lab’s Adobe Photoshop. Photoshop is a raster graphics based software made out of a group of dots called pixels. It is considered by many professionals as the industry standard for photo editing, and used to improve and modify artwork for printing, promotion, and web design. It is easy to cut, paste and crop, as well as having a large filter gallery that allows you to sharpen, blur, or distort your photos. You can effortlessly remove scratches, wrinkles, or spots with tools such as the healing brush. A feature first introduced in the CS5, and now also available in the CS6, is the content aware tool. This content aware tool has received much praise from professionals for its ability to remove obstacles from the foreground without affecting the contents of the background. Many other amazing features within Photoshop include the liquify tool, which helps amplify objects and change their appearance. Missed out on the yearly family photo? With the layer mask you can blend yourself into the image as if you were always there. The best part of Photoshop is that you can seamlessly transfer your images to Dreamweaver, Illustrator, or InDesign with greater flexibility. If you would like to take advantage of Photoshop’s many amazing features, visit the GIS/Media Lab where we have both version CS5 and CS6 for your free use. For more information and questions visit the GIS/Media Lab on the Library’s 4th floor, or call us at (956) 665-7240.

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Graphic Design Class Helps Promote Library Services

by Peter Cortez

The Library would like to extend its sincerest gratitude to Sara Gonzalez and students in her Graphic Design II Class (ART 4434) for their creative designs promoting the Library and its many services. Over the course of the spring semester, her students came up with individual designs and ideas that could be incorporated in to posters, bookmarks, tee shirts and other promotional items for the Library. Their final designs were both informative and artistically dynamic and have been on display at the Library’s art gallery. Library staff voted on the posters with the Dean selecting the overall best presentation from the top three designs that received the most votes.

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Faculty Spotlight: Dr. Leticia De Leon

by Kelly Leu

Dr. Leticia De Leon is an Associate Professor in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction of the College of Education and has been with the University of Texas-Pan American since 2001. Her past education includes a Doctor of Education from the University of Houston. She is also a proud alumnus, having earned both her Bachelor’s and Master of Education degrees here at UTPA.

Dr. De Leon’s research and teaching focuses on improving student learning experiences and gaining a better understanding about student motivation. Teaching all her courses online, she is very interested in exploring how technology can be used to enhance student learning. For example, she currently uses Second Life, a software application that allows people to create virtual worlds, in a teaching methods course to provide students with simulated teaching experiences. In her current research, she examines learner motivation, specifically how a student’s perceptions and life experiences might enhance or hinder their learning experience. She often finds that observations she makes in her courses help to inform her research. She points out that it is particularly interesting to see how students’ personal world views impact how they address challenging issues posed in course assignments.

In addition to research and teaching, Dr. De Leon is involved in multiple initiatives to promote student success in the College of Education. Along with a team of other dedicated COE personnel, she serves as a certification requirement “Sherpa” for students, tracking their progress and advising them about the resources and services available to them. Dr. De Leon also coordinates the “Fitness to Teach Academy,” a voluntary professional development program directed towards juniors and seniors that introduces students to various issues key to their success as education professionals, including professional ethics and deportment.

Dr. De Leon is the author of numerous articles and book chapters, some of which can be found via the Library’s databases. A few of her more recent publications include:

De Leon, L. (2013). Chapter 13: Managing Technological Innovation and Issues of Licensing in Higher Education. In Contemporary Perspectives on Technological Innovation, Management and Policy. (Ed.) Ran, B. Information Age Publishing: Charlotte, NC.

De Leon, L. (2012). Model of Models: Mediating Learning for Preservice Teachers through a Vygotskian Scaffold. The Educational Forum, 76(2). 144-157.

Peña, C. and De Leon, L. (2011). The Use of Digital Video to Foster Reflective Practice in Teacher Education. International Journal of Instructional Media, 38(2). 125-132.

De Leon, L., Peña, C. and Whitacre, M. (2010). Fostering Student Discourse through an Online Student Teacher Support Group: A Phenomenological Study. International Journal of Instructional Media, 37(4), 355-364.

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Library Hours

 

Regular Summer Hours
Sunday: 1:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.
Monday – Thursday: 7:30 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.
Friday: 7:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday: 10:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Exceptions to Regular Hours
July 4: CLOSED
July 7: Open 7:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
July 8: Open 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
August 14: Open 7:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.
August 15: Open 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
August 16-17: CLOSED
August 18-22: Open 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
August 23-24: CLOSED

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Life at the Library Photo Gallery

Click on first photo to enlarge and start the slideshow and press Esc to exit.

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Credits

Editor:  Diane Tyink

Writers:  Peter Cortez, Virginia Haynie Gause, Kelly Leu, Carl Nelson, Roy Resendez, Rick Peralez, John Asbell

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Upcoming Library Events

  • August 25, 2014

    Welcome Week (August 25-29, 2014)

    Starts: 12:00 am

    Ends: 12:00 am, August 30, 2014

  • August 27, 2014

    The Panza Monologues with Virginia Grise & W.A.K.E.-UP!

    Starts: 6:00 pm

    Ends: 8:00 pm, August 27, 2014

  • September 21, 2014

    Banned Book Week (September 21−27, 2014)

    Starts: 12:00 am

    Ends: 12:00 am, September 28, 2014

  • October 31, 2014

    Bioethics Conference Student Research Posters exhibit

    Starts: 12:00 am

    Ends: 12:00 am, December 2, 2014

  • April 12, 2015

    National Library Week - April 12-18, 2015

    Starts: 12:00 am

    Ends: 12:00 am, April 19, 2015

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